Academics

Explore our Curriculum

Mathematics

Our program emphasizes the content and skills that promote longterm mathematical growth and achievement. We encourage students to imagine, play with ideas, and become comfortable using multiple approaches. Students’ coursework builds habits of curiosity, initiative, organization and reflectiveness. Students develop their abilities to make connections, apply ideas in new settings, and make sense of ideas through individual study and collaborative activity. Students learn and communicate using a variety of mathematical tools, methods, forms and technology. In all our courses, students develop abilities in the multiple dimensions of mathematics that are needed for postsecondary and interdisciplinary studies.

Procedural fluency, conceptual understanding, adaptive reasoning and strategic competence all contribute to students’ confidence and proficiency. To develop these strands, students learn standard methods and how to construct and analyze logical arguments. Extended tasks and investigations emphasize the roles of creativity, practice and persistence in math. Projects and non-routine problems provide contexts for individual challenges within and across disciplines.

Placement is determined by achievement in prior courses, placement testing, and other available data on student learning. Each student is required to complete a three-year sequence of courses that builds on her previous studies; each student is expected to complete a fourth course in Grade 12. AP courses are available to students who have demonstrated high achievement in the prerequisite courses.
  • Advanced Algebra

    Prerequisites: Algebra and Geometry
    In this course students deepen their understanding of the uses of
    variables by modeling real-world contexts involving quadratic,
    polynomial, radical, rational, logarithmic and exponential functions.
    Students use graphical, symbolic, verbal and numerical representations to describe and understand situations, and make predictions
    about functions and their graphs. Students lay a foundation for
    future mathematics coursework by using technology to conduct
    investigations, by reasoning with algebraic expressions and by
    communicating ideas in written sentences and reports.
  • Algebra

    Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra course or equivalent In this course, students study operations with variables and methods of solving equations, with an emphasis on linear and quadratic functions. Students learn to perform and explain the reasoning behind procedures involving systems of equations, inequalities, exponents and polynomials. Students use verbal descriptions, equations, tables of values, and graphs to solve problems and model real-world situations. Geometric figures are used to explain algebraic results, and problems from geometry serve as contexts for algebraic work. Students write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems, provide justifications for conclusions, and gain insight into the behavior of functions.
  • Algebra I

    Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra course or equivalent

    In this course, students study operations with variables and methods of solving equations, with an emphasis on linear and quadratic functions. Students learn to perform and explain the reasoning behind procedures involving systems of equations, inequalities, exponents and polynomials. Students use verbal descriptions, equations, tables of values, and graphs to solve problems and model real-world situations. Geometric figures are used to explain algebraic results, and problems from geometry serve as contexts for algebraic work. Students write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems, provide justifications for conclusions, and gain insight into the behavior of functions.
  • AP Calculus AB

    Prerequisite: Precalculus and recommendation of the Department

    This course in calculus of a single variable meets the curricular
    requirements of the College Board course description for Calculus
    AB. Students study techniques and properties involving derivatives,
    integrals, and limits, using approximation, applications, modeling
    and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to understand contexts
    and theories involving rates of change and accumulation. Students
    examine questions and solve problems using graphical, numerical,
    symbolic and verbal representations. Students learn to use a graphing
    calculator, along with other technology, to investigate situations
    and support their conclusions. All students are required to take the
    AP examination.
  • AP Calculus BC

    Prerequisite: Precalculus and recommendation of the Department

    This course in calculus of a single variable meets the curricular
    requirements of the College Board course description for Calculus
    BC, and so includes all of the content of Calculus AB, with the
    same approaches and emphasis. Calculus BC-only topics include
    parametric and polar equations, vectors, sequences, power series, and
    selected other techniques and theorems of calculus. All students are
    required to take the AP examination. Note: Students may enroll in
    Calculus BC after Calculus AB only with special permission of the
    Department. Students who take this course after AP Calculus AB
    will repeat all of the content from that course.
  • AP Statistics

    Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra and recommendation of the Department

    This college-level course in statistics meets the curricular requirements
    of the College Board course description. The course introduces
    students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing
    and drawing conclusions from data. The topics are divided into four
    major themes: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability and
    statistical inference. Students use graphing calculators with statistical
    capabilities to model, explore, make discoveries and analyze data.
    All students are required to take the AP examination, and in accordance
    with the College Board course description, learn to express
    ideas using full sentences and paragraphs along with graphs, tables
    and equations.
  • Applied Calculus

    Prerequisite: Precalculus and by recommendation of the department

    This college-level course in calculus of a single variable covers limits, derivatives and their applications, as well as integrals and their applications. By examining real-world contexts, particularly in the area of business, economics and the natural sciences, students learn how to pose questions that can be answered using the concepts and procedures of calculus. Situations are presented in the form that they may occur in context: graphically, symbolically, verbally and numerically; students answer questions using those same four approaches. Students use technology to investigate situations, solve problems and support their conclusions.
     
  • Calculus

    Prerequisite: Precalculus and recommendation of the Department

    This is a college-level course in calculus of a single variable that
    draws from the College Board course description for AP Calculus
    AB. Students study techniques and properties involving derivatives,
    integrals, and limits, using approximation, applications, modeling and
    the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to understand contexts and
    theorems involving rates of change and accumulation. Students examine
    questions and solve problems using graphical, numerical, symbolic
    and verbal representations. Students learn to use a graphing calculator,
    along with other technology, to investigate situations and support
    their conclusions. Students in this course may be scheduled into the
    same section as students enrolled in AP Calculus AB, but assignments,
    assessments, and grading expectations in Calculus will vary from AP
    curricular requirements.
  • Functions and Trigonometry

    Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra and recommendation of the Department

    This course is designed to strengthen students’ skill and understanding
    of variables and functions in preparation for a precalculus course.
    Students pose questions about and model real-world situations using
    a wide variety of functions, including linear, quadratic, polynomial,
    power, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric. Students use
    technology to investigate situations, develop their graphing skills,
    analyze the graphs of functions and deepen their understanding of
    how to solve equations. By examining functions verbally, graphically,
    numerically and symbolically, students increase their ability to engage
    in independent problem-solving activities.
  • Geometry

    Prerequisite: Algebra
    In this course, students study relationships and establish results involving measurement, shape and position. Content includes similarity, congruence, coordinates, trigonometric ratios, two- and three-dimensional figures, area and volume. Students use variables and geometric relationships to model real-world phenomena. Students study algebraic functions that arise in geometric contexts, and use algebra to understand geometric relationships. Logical reasoning is a focus of the course; students examine assumptions, evaluate conjectures and determine the validity of conclusions using various forms of proof. Dynamic geometry software is used for investigative work, to develop understanding of results, and as one of a variety of tools for creation of proofs.
  • Math 1

    Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra course or equivalent

    In this course, students study operations with variables and methods
    of solving equations, with an emphasis on linear and quadratic functions.
    Students learn to perform and explain the reasoning behind
    procedures involving systems of equations, inequalities, exponents
    and polynomials. Students use verbal descriptions, equations, tables
    of values, and graphs to solve problems and model real-world
    situations. Geometric figures are used to explain algebraic results,
    and problems from geometry serve as contexts for algebraic work.
    Students write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems,
    provide justifications for conclusions, and gain insight into the
    behavior of functions.
  • Multivariable Calculus

    Prerequisite: AP Calculus BC and recommendation of the Department.
    This course may be offered online through One Schoolhouse or onsite.
    Students extend their study of calculus, learning new subtleties and
    applications of limits, continuity, differentiation and integration in
    higher dimensions. Content includes vectors in Euclidean space,
    partial derivatives, line and surface integrals, and Green’s and Stokes’
    theorems. Students learn to recognize and express the ideas of the
    course graphically, numerically, symbolically and in writing and
    further develop skills of independent math thinking essential to
    upper level undergraduate math courses. The course emphasizes the
    use and synthesis of different learning resources, and reading mathematical
    writing.
  • Precalculus

    Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra and recommendation of the Department
    This course focuses on the study of the multiple meanings and uses
    of the functions used in college-level mathematics. Students study
    functions from geometric, numerical, verbal, graphical and analytic
    perspectives, and learn how to construct functions as models of real world
    contexts. Students reason with polynomial, rational, trigonometric,
    exponential and logarithmic expressions, justifying conjectures and
    explaining the behavior of functions, in preparation for the study and
    application of rates of change in calculus. Students also extend their
    use of mathematical structure to study polar coordinates, parametic
    equations and vectors. Students use technology to pose questions,
    investigate situations and support their conclusions.
  • Research in Advanced Mathematics

    Prerequisite: Calculus AB, BC or recommendation of the Department

    In this course, students conduct research in a selected area of college
    mathematics (e.g., game theory, graph theory & networks, combinatorics,
    number theory, college geometry). Students learn about
    the cycle of research in mathematics: conjecture, investigation, datagathering,
    generalization, abstraction and proof. Students develop
    questions, approaches and results, writing definitions, justifying their
    conclusions and reading and writing mathematical proof. A primary
    goal of the course is to develop students’ ability to initiate and carry
    out a long term research project to completion. Students are expected
    to write a complete mathematical paper at the end of the course
    using undergraduate math research standards.
  • Statistics

    Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra or by recommendation of the department

    This course is intended to provide students with an introduction to statistics. Statistics is the branch of mathematics that deals with the collection, organization and interpretation of numerical data with the goal of making predictions about the population under study or to make comparisons between two groups. Students study random sampling methods for collecting data, various graphical techniques for organizing data and significance tests and confidence intervals to interpret the data. They also explore probability and the normal, binomial and geometric distributions. An emphasis is placed on real-world applications and writing; there are frequent projects throughout the year.

Department Faculty

  • Photo of Ralph Pantozzi
    Ralph Pantozzi
    US Math
    Bio
  • Photo of Richard Biddulph
    Richard Biddulph
    US Math
    Bio
  • Photo of Ilaria Durbal
    Ilaria Durbal
    US Math
    Bio
  • Photo of Evelyn Hanna
    Evelyn Hanna
    STEM Innovation, Computer Science and Engineering Chair; Mathematics Chair
    Bio
  • Photo of Elena Iannuzzi
    Elena Iannuzzi
    US Math
    Bio
  • Photo of Nancy Manjovski
    Nancy Manjovski
    US Math
    Bio
  • Photo of Shannon McPartland
    Shannon McPartland
    MS Math
    Bio
  • Photo of Michelle Murphy
    Michelle Murphy
    Dean of Students/ US Math
    Bio
  • Photo of Alicia Rodriguez
    Alicia Rodriguez
    MS/US Math
    Bio
  • Photo of Peter Wertz
    Peter Wertz
    US Math
    Bio
Kent Place School is an all-girls K through 12 independent college preparatory day school with a coeducational Preschool, located in Summit, NJ.